The importance of connection in art, by Charles Sluga

Our friendly and enthusiastic Australian painting tutor Charles Sluga is returning to the mill for another of his famous watercolour courses this October (Special offer! See below.)

And he’s just posted another fascinating tip in his monthly newsletter, on staying connected in your painting.

Charles says: Just as we like to connect with people in the world, we must connect shapes in our paintings. It is a way of allowing and controlling the way the viewer’s eye travels through the painting. It also unifies the painting and makes it work as one and read well.

Painting by Charles Sluga, a tutor at The Watermill at Posara painting holidays/vacations, Tuscany Italy.

Adagio in C by Charles Sluga

Charles adds:Now, it is important to note that not everything in your picture needs to be touching or connected. You can have spaces like in the painting of the Scuba Lesson below. However you do want some overlap in areas. This would be a very different painting and not work as well if each of those figures were a separate entity. So weather you are painting groups of people, like in the paintings below, buildings, still life, landscapes…. it doesn’t matter.  HAVE SOME CONNECTION.”

Charles says: “Just as we like to connect with people in the world, we must connect shapes in our paintings. It is a way of allowing and controlling the way the viewer's eye travels through the painting. It also unifies the painting and makes it work as one and read well.”

The scuba lesson, by Charles Sluga

New photo of Charles 2012Charles Sluga is a highly respected and sought-after watercolour artist in Australia who has gained a reputation for his versatility in both his technique and choice of subject matter. He’s a great teacher, with a friendly and enthusiastic approach and an eagerness to impart his wide knowledge.

 

 

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